Tech Marinade
Uncovering Hidden Innovation in DIY Electronics
Weekend Crowd Fund Picks
by Ryan Sailor ▪ 9.7.2014 Crowd Fund

It’s a great weekend to browse a few crowdfund sites for new projects. Here are three projects you should consider backing.

CANBus Triple

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Modern cars are packed with electronics: engine diagnostics, dashboard panels, GPS units, satellite radio, cameras, sensors. Computers on wheels, basically. Simpler models might have a few dozen processors, whereas complex luxury vehicles can have well over 100. In order to allow the many diverse electronic units in the car to talk to each other, cars use a standard communication protocol called Controller Area Network Bus (shortened to CAN Bus).

As makers, we ask: how can we get inside this vast array of little car computers? The CANBus Triple – now funded on kickstarter – provides an answer. It’s an Arduino-compatible device with three CAN bus controllers. If you know how to install a car alarm, you can open up your car’s electronics to the CANBus Triple. For a $75 pledge, you will receive a first-run CANBus Triple from their campaign. Read more about it at the kickstarter.

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Hathway Has Assembled the Team for Their Inaugural Internship of Things
by Kyle Patrick Cayabyab ▪ 6.3.2014 News

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As college students head into the summer months, either beginning their internships or drastically searching for one at the last minute, there are five who will be doing more than simply fetching coffee. A different internship is starting at the digital agency Hathway.

Located in San Luis Obispo, CA, Hathway builds consumer brands and enterprise businesses online. This is accomplished by creating mobile strategies and applications that will entice consumers into discovering the client companies. These strategies and applications are also supplemented with web development and social application support. Hathway has worked with companies such as BEHR, Amway, Mindbody, and more.

However, what Hathway seeks to build goes beyond the reputation and the interactivity between consumer and client. This Internship of Things (IoT) has gathered five outstanding students in the fields of engineering and marketing to work together on building innovative devices connected together for the Internet of Things.

The Internet of Things is a term for connected devices such as Google Glass, Tile, iBeacon and Nest that transform everyday things into network-connected wonders. These devices allow users to lock their doors, change their home temperature and a host of other activities by using their mobile device.

Florent Ferere, Head of Innovation at Hathway and director of the IoT program, said he hopes the program will end with a crowdfunding campaign for the final product.

“This is an amazing and exciting program where students will be creating a product over the summer,” Ferere said. “It’s like starting a company in a garage, but with the support of Hathway and leading technology companies. We are looking forward to working with the team and helping them launch their crowdfunding campaign.”

These interns will work through the entire product-development process this summer, from inception to development to release. They will also be supported via sponsorships from companies such as Indiegogo as well as notable Cal Poly alumni. Through these sponsorships, Hathway will provide insight, guidance, and mentorship to help the students succeed.

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Incredible Robotics Kit Rero Launches Indiegogo Campaign
by Ryan Sailor ▪ 12.17.2013 News

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“With your support let us wish together the dream of leading a whole new generation of engineers and innovators and to help build better and smarter futures.”

An inspirational quote from the team behind Rero captures the essence of their new easy configurable robotics kit.

Reminiscent of Lego Mindstorms, Rero is a modular robotics kit made easy for makers of all ages. The creators at Cytron Technologies in Malaysia developed Rero to enable children to delve into robotics without the need to be experts in the field.

It’s one part learning tool and two parts fun. And I doubt kids will be their only customers.
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