Tech Marinade
Uncovering Hidden Innovation in DIY Electronics
Tutorial Roundup #4: Instruments!
by Ryan Sailor ▪ 11.15.2013 Features

Instrumentation is expensive. A decent desktop oscilloscope can run well over $300. When you don’t have the cash to spend on instrumentation to test your creations, what must a Maker do? Build your own, of course! This week, we have collected three tutorials to help you Make the tools you need to analyze and test your projects. Continue Reading

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The All-In-One Card Startup Coin Offers An Arduino Bluetooth Low Energy Developer Kit
by Kyle Patrick Cayabyab ▪ 11.14.2013 News

coin_productIf you haven’t already heard, there is this new card that has been developed, and it isn’t of the Pokemon or Magic variety. This card can act as a representative of your entire wallet and be programmed to swipe as your credit, debit, or loyalty cards and more! This convenient marvel that does away with thick wallets is called the Coin. By using the Coin mobile app and a swipe dongle on your smartphone, you can upload your various cards onto both the app and your Coin device. All you need to do is swipe your card through, take pictures of both sides, and fill in the rest of the details. The mobile app can hold an unlimited number of card data and you can add up to 8 cards onto your Coin device. When it comes time to make your payment, you can simply choose which card you need using the interface located on the card and swipe. And if you happen to stray away from the card, the mobile app will warn you that you may have lost your Coin device. This is done via a Bluetooth Low energy (BLE) module that Coin developed themselves and now offers a kit for others to use!

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The Beast: One Board To Rule Them All
by Ryan Sailor ▪ 11.12.2013 Hacks

“The Beast” is the result of an ambitious summer project by Swiss embedded systems engineer Mathieu Stephen. According to his blog┬áhe was given two months during the summer to create a piece of hardware for his father that could fulfill a number of connectivity and sensor control requirements. Mathieu, who goes by the alias “limpkin”, has a history of developing unique embedded devices such as The Whistled, an indoor solar energy harvester, and even a project for Logitech. Instead of using an Arduino or any other pre-fab microcontroller unit, he opted for a homemade approach for The Beast.

Sexy close-up of The Beast. source: limpkin's blog

Sexy close-up of The Beast. source: limpkin’s blog

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littleBits Orchestrate A Modular Harmony That Is Pleasant To The Ears And Mind
by Kyle Patrick Cayabyab ▪ 11.11.2013 News

We are moving into an age of creativity and customization; two worlds that are quickly reaching a convergence. The waves of artistic submissions found on numerous social media sites such as Vine, Instagram, and YouTube foster an evolving community, with passive collaborative inspiration in the form of memes fueling it. Businesses today are focusing more on the unique and small numbered rather than the vast quantities of uniform goods. Consumers want to change their products, to make them their own, as seen by increased customizability in products like the iPhone 5C. This uniqueness coupled with the desire to share the results of creative forging is greeted by an open source population of musical modules known as littleBits.

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Meet Dash: A New Hexapedal DIY Robot Critter
by Kyle Patrick Cayabyab ▪ 11.10.2013 News

While perusing the various projects at Dragon Innovation, I happened upon a curious little robot that reminded me of those Hexbugs you can find at toy stores. However, instead of seemingly vibration at a flip of a switch to move, this critter navigates via six legs. Meet Dash, the brainchild of four current and former UC Berkeley students.

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Tutorial Roundup #3: Sensors!
by Ryan Sailor ▪ 11.8.2013 Features

As makers we like to bridge the gap between the analog world and the digital one. Grabbing real-world data, analyzing it, and reacting to it is much more exhilarating when the process takes place through electronics as opposed to, say, our brains. Sure, you could always stick your beak outside and predict a chilly day. But, it’s just so much more satisfying that your custom mobile weather app will also send a signal heat up your coffee a few extra degrees in preparation. This is why we love sensors.

This week we’ve pulled together three tutorials on some interesting sensors to help you collect the data you need, or maybe provide some inspiration for a project.

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